Funny Irish Sayings That Confuse Americans

Krystal Smith

Irish slang is known for its distinctive charm. It has gained international recognition through famous people such as Graham Norton and Liam Neeson. Such unique expressions are trending globally and many are confused about their meaning, specifically in the USA.  Are you competent in Irish sayings? Below are some of our favorites.

I’m Grand

Image Credit: Shutterstock

One of the more common phrases in Ireland is, “I’m grand.” It’s used regularly and means, someone is doing just fine or is happy. Those who don’t speak English as a first language could easily be mistaken.

Craic

Image Credit: Shutterstock

“Craic” is pronounced “crack” and means having fun or a good time. This can confuse Americans because they often say, “You crack me up,” which sounds the same but has a different meaning. It might take some time to get used to this difference. 

Are You Okay?

Image Credit: Shutterstock

US Americans are used to associating the phrase “Are you okay?” with their inner well-being. In Ireland, it means “What can I help you with?”. So when someone asks if “you are okay” after dinner, the waiter is probably trying to give you a hint for the check.

Have a Fag

Image Credit: Shutterstock

This phrase will definitely confuse Americans; for Ireland and the UK, fag means having a cigarette and not an offensive insult.

Yer Man

Image Credit: Shutterstock

When you hear “Yer man is outside causing a scene,” they don’t literally mean your man. The true meaning refers to a random person, as ‘Yer man’ is the same as saying “that guy/person.” 

 I Will, Yeah

Image Credit: Shutterstock

This phrase proves that the Irish are both sarcastic and subtle. “I will, yeah” always means no. It is similar to when Americans say “yeah…. no,” but not as clear.

Yoke

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Yoke (pronounced yolk) literally means “that thing.” You will usually hear this when someone talks about a random item that does not have much value, for example, give me that pen or pass me that towel, etc.

Langers

Image Credit: Shutterstock

In America, they call getting drunk “wasted”. In Ireland, they got a little more creative. Langer actually means a fool or an idiot. “Langers” is the act of being drunk, another meaning of drunk. 

Chipper

Image Credit: Shutterstock

A chipper is a takeaway place that sells chips (French fries), fish, battered sausages, and other fried foods. After a night of partying and alcohol, everyone goes to a chipper for a midnight snack.

Tod

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Tod means to be alone, and people say it when they are going out alone or just alone in general.

As Happy as Larry

Image Credit: Shutterstock

People often say they or their friends are “As happy as Larry” when they have no worries or cares.

Manky

Image Credit: Shutterstock

The word “Manky” describes something dirty. For example, “Their kitchen is manky.”

Acting the Maggot

Image Credit: Shutterstock

If a person is “Acting the maggot,” it means they are messing around and not doing what they are supposed to.

Thick

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Thick does not mean the size or value of something as it would in the US. In Ireland and the UK, thick means “Stupid.” It can also describe someone annoyed.

Fictional Characters You Might Not Know Are Based On Real People

Image Credit: Lucasfilm, Ltd.

t’s no secret that real people serve as inspiration for a lot of fictional characters. You might be surprised to learn that the following characters are real people.

Fictional Characters You Might Not Know Are Based On Real People

Biggest Lies in American History That We Were Led to Believe

Image Credit: Shutterstock

False information, commonly known as fake news, is a modern phenomenon, as evidenced by these historical untruths about America that have been ingrained in our understanding for years.

Biggest Lies in American History That We Were Led to Believe

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment